Fuji-san in Momiji-Gari

Fuji-san in Momiji-Gari

Fuji-san in Momiji-Gari

There is no doubt that Japan, for all of its industrialisation and high-density infrastructure, still contains a remarkable amount of natural scenery. Waterfalls, forests, gardens, and of course the spectacular Mt Fuji, are some examples of natural scenery in Japan that are well worth taking the time to go and see. In this article I shall endeavour to explain two seasonal events that are thought to be the height of cool scenic natural phenomena in Japan. I personally also find these phenomena to be pretty spectacular.

Fujiyama

Fujiyama

Fujiyama

In English, the mountain is known as Mount Fuji. Some sources refer to it as “Fuji-san”, “Fujiyama” or, redundantly, “Mt. Fujiyama”. Japanese speakers refer to the mountain as “Fuji-san”. This “san” is not the honorific suffix used with people’s names, such as Watanabe-san, but the on-reading of the character yama (山, lit. “mountain”) used in Sino-Japanese compounds. In Nihon-shiki and Kunrei-shiki romanization, the name is transliterated as Huzi.

Other Japanese names for Mount Fuji, which have become obsolete or poetic, include Fuji-no-Yama (ふじの山, lit. “the Mountain of Fuji”), Fuji-no-Takane (ふじの高嶺, lit. “the High Peak of Fuji”), Fuyō-hō (芙蓉峰, lit. “the Lotus Peak”), and Fugaku (富岳/富嶽, created by combining the first character of 富士, Fuji, and 岳, mountain).

Mount Fuji (Shizuoka Prefecture)

Mount Fuji (Shizuoka Prefecture) 1a

While Mount Fuji is famous the world over as a symbol of Japan, reports from many tourists who have climbed Japan’s highest mountain say they’re not sure they’d do it again. A combination of the popularity of Fujisan and the short climbing season means you’ll be ascending it along with hoards of others. The secret is that climbing Fuji is not the only way to experience it! Remember Hokusai’s Thirty Six Views of Mt. Fuji? I chose to rent a car and drive around the Five Lakes region where I could admire the volcano at every turn. Fujisan was everywhere: looming over the horizon, reflected in the water, bathed in moonlight. Every morning we shared a cup of coffee from a campsite along the lake. There are many ways to see Mount Fuji without climbing it. If you are a Starbucks fan with a car, you can enjoy a morning Joe while gazing at the mountain at the Starbucks branch Tomei Highway rest area (Fujigawa Service Area Lower) in Shizuoka.

Mount Fuji (Shizuoka Prefecture) 1b

Mount Fuji from the forest

Mount Fuji from the forest. In English, the mountain is known as Mount Fuji. Some sources refer to it as “Fuji-san”, “Fujiyama” or, redundantly, “Mt. Fujiyama”. Japanese speakers refer to the mountain as “Fuji-san”. This “san” is not the honorific suffix used with people’s names, such as Watanabe-san, but the on-reading of the character yama used in Sino-Japanese compounds. In Nihon-shiki and Kunrei-shiki romanization, the name is transliterated as Huzi. Other Japanese names for Mount Fuji, which have become obsolete or poetic, include Fuji-no-Yama (“the Mountain of Fuji”), Fuji-no-Takane (“the High Peak of Fuji”), Fuyō-hō (“the Lotus Peak”), and Fugaku.

Mount Fuji from the forest

Moonrise at Mt.Fuji

Moonrise at Mt.Fuji – pure hocus-pocus…

Mt. Fuji Climbing Season; July 1st – Oct 1st: Only people lucky enough to visit Japan during this time have the opportunity to challenge themselves by climbing to the top of Mt. Fuji, Japan’s highest peak and a spiritual site. The two – day tour is an experience of a life time, however the climb is not for everyone, it takes a good 7 to 9 hours of physical effort and sometimes steep climbing to reach the top. Nonetheless, reaching the peak of Mount Fuji is very rewarding. As you stare down at the world below, and watch the sunrise, you feel a huge sense of accomplishmentsun-rise realizing just how high you have climbed, it is truly an satisfying memorable experience.

Visit Japan – Mount Fuji (Shizuoka Prefecture)

While Mount Fuji is famous the world over as a symbol of Japan, reports from many tourists who have climbed Japan’s highest mountain say they’re not sure they’d do it again. A combination of the popularity of Fujisan and the short climbing season means you’ll be ascending it along with hoards of others. The secret is that climbing Fuji is not the only way to experience it.